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Pet The Bunny

Rabbit Education

Discover the truth about rabbit care and ensure your furry friend thrives with proper space, diet, and specialized care.

Rethink Rabbit Care

MYTH

FACT

Rabbits are caged pets.

Rabbits need a minimum of 16 sq feet of floor space at all times.

MYTH

FACT

Rabbits only need pellets as a part of their diet.

A rabbit's diet should consist of:

  • 80% Hay

  • 15% Fresh Veggies

  • 5% Pellets & Treats

Important Facts Before Bringing a Rabbit Home

01

Lifespan

Rabbits live an average of 8-10 years (often longer).

03

Suitability

Rabbits do NOT make good pets for small children and are not suited as "starter" pets.

05

Veterinary Care

Rabbits are considered "exotic" pets and require a veterinarian that specializes in rabbit care and ailments. Exotic veterinary care can be very expensive.

07

Living Conditions

Rabbits should be kept as indoor pets.

02

Digestive Health

Rabbits have very sensitive digestive tracts. GI stasis can be deadly if not treated within 24-48 hours.

04

Behavior

Rabbits are chewers! You will need to rabbit-proof your home.

06

Spaying/Neutering

Rabbits must be spayed or neutered to prevent hormonal problems and reproductive cancers.

Diet

80%

Hay

A rabbit's diet should be composed of 80% Timothy Hay (fed in unlimited amounts).

 

Alfalfa hay is only suitable for rabbits 6 months of age and under, or nursing/pregnant mothers.

 

Hay helps to wear down their continuously growing teeth, preventing severe health issues.

15%

Fresh Vegetables

15% of their diet should be fresh vegetables.

 

Including dark leafy greens, herbs, and wheat grass.

 

Avoid high-calcium vegetables.

5%

Pellets & Treats

5% of their diet should be high-quality, Timothy-based kibble and occasional treats.

 

Avoid low-quality pellets with coloured bits, seed-based, or yogurt-based treats.

Common Ailments

01

GI Stasis

Rabbits have very delicate gastrointestinal tracts. Symptoms include not eating, not pooping, hunching over, lethargy, and tooth grinding. This condition requires immediate veterinary care and can be fatal within 24-48 hours.

03

Respiratory Issues

Rabbits have delicate respiratory tracts and can easily contract "snuffles," which may be acute or chronic. Symptoms include nasal discharge, ocular discharge, and difficulty breathing.

02

Tooth Problems

A rabbit's teeth never stop growing. Overgrown teeth can cause mouth ulcers, abscesses, eye problems, and upper respiratory issues. Chewing hay helps to grind down their teeth.

Housing

01

Space

NO CAGES! Rabbits require a minimum of 16 square feet of floor space at all times to move, run, and jump.

03

Enclosure Essentials

Include a litter box with rabbit-safe litter, food and water dishes, a hay bin/container, a hide for security, and enrichment items like interactive toys and wooden chews.

02

Flooring

To prevent pododermatitis/sore hocks, provide soft flooring such as carpet, foam pads, and fleece blankets.

Common Ailments

01

Social Interaction

Do not keep your rabbit isolated. Rabbits need social interactions and should be kept in high-traffic areas of your home.

03

Chewing Habits

Protect items in your home, such as electrical cords, from being chewed when your rabbit is roaming.

02

Playtime

Rabbits enjoy playing with toys they can push or pull, and they love cardboard and wooden chew toys.

03

Adjustment Period

When bringing a rabbit home, expect initial undesirable behaviors like chewing, not using the litter box, and shyness. Give your rabbit time to adjust and consult your veterinarian for behavioral issue solutions.

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Rabbit Education

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